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Friday, August 05, 2016

Evolution-denying the decomposition of DNA with magic hand-waving

They have no idea how Dinosaur DNA could survive 76 million years.

by StFerdIII

 

DNA decomposes. It is organic. It has to. But not if you are an evolution cult member. Than by pure magic, random chance, and 'mutations' perhaps, DNA stays alive for 75 million years ! Just trust the scientists. They know everything !

 

'An open-access paper in Geology documents the existence of DNA in ocean sediments up to 1.4 million years old in their dating scheme. The DNA appears to be from chloroplasts from algae, such as diatoms (abbreviated cpDNA). There’s less of it in the deeper sediments from two cores drilled into the seafloor in the Bering Sea, but it never disappears, even in the deepest sections. [Note: Ma = million years, ka or k.y. = thousand years.] ….

 

The Allentoft paper is open access and measured the DNA half-life in Moa bones to be 521 years. That these earlier finds were “at odds with the current understanding of DNA preservation” motivated their own work. Yet from measuring cpDNA from these cores, they had to conclude that “the preservation of fossil cpDNA over geological time” must be reconsidered. The fact that the DNA does decrease with depth shows that decay does occur. Why, then, would the decay basically stop at some “inflection point”? “At our sites, this inflection occurs at ca. 100–200 ka [ka = thousand years], suggesting that after this point, fossil DNA does not appear to interact at an appreciable rate with enzymes or cells found in this sediment.” Why? They have no idea. In conclusion, they say:

 

Plankton DNA in marine sediment decays over geologic time (e.g., Boere et al., 2011b). At our Bering Sea sites, the majority of cpDNA sequences disappear within the first 100–200 k.y., but traces are present in sediment of every age sampled (as old as 1.4 Ma). Some of these cpDNA reads match siliceous microfossil taxa previously identified in the same sedimentary sequences, suggesting that microfossils may help to preserve DNA. This persistence of a small relative fraction beyond 1 Ma suggests that residual cpDNA becomes increasingly recalcitrant with increasing sediment age. These results highlight both (1) the potential of fossil DNA for paleoecology studies, and (2) its relative isolation from the biogeochemical processes driven by active subseafloor microbiota.

 

They know DNA decays. Even if it is relatively isolated from biogeochemical processes, it should still decay. References to some unknown process of “recalcitrance” amounts to mere hand-waving. Here is an anomaly calling for explanation.'

 

Coming up with the rhetoric of 'recalcitrance' to preserve organic material is not science. The so -called proof that the magicians of evolution use, namely, plankton DNA do not lend themselves to Dino DNA for example, nor are they even sensible and repeatable observations or experiments. And in any event, they clearly state themselves that almost all of the DNA disappears within 200.000 years. So tell us again how soft Dino tissue and DNA lasts 76 million years ?